Bangladesh Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism

EDITORIAL
Year
: 2022  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 3--4

Commencement of the journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism with the commitments not to imitate but to innovate competitively for the exploration of versatile field of Endocrinology and Metabolism


M Abu Sayeed 
 Department of Community Medicine, Ibrahim Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Correspondence Address:
Prof. M Abu Sayeed
Department of Community Medicine, Ibrahim Medical College, Dhaka
Bangladesh




How to cite this article:
Sayeed M A. Commencement of the journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism with the commitments not to imitate but to innovate competitively for the exploration of versatile field of Endocrinology and Metabolism.Bangladesh J Endocrinol Metab 2022;1:3-4


How to cite this URL:
Sayeed M A. Commencement of the journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism with the commitments not to imitate but to innovate competitively for the exploration of versatile field of Endocrinology and Metabolism. Bangladesh J Endocrinol Metab [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Dec 5 ];1:3-4
Available from: https://www.bjem.org/text.asp?2022/1/1/3/353714


Full Text



M Abu Sayeed, Professor (retd.), Community Medicine, Ibrahim Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A Medical Science Journal Bangladesh Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism (BJEM) is going to emerge. Any emergence of such scientific journal delights us all, who foresee Endocrine science in Bangladesh to a level of competence to contribute to the field of Endocrine and Metabolism (EM) not only in Bangladesh but also aiming to contribute to medical science of the developing world. We all agree that the people of the developing nations suffer from a paucity of research due to lack of trained workforce, technology, finance, and overall working environment. Bangladesh and all other developing nations are mostly dependent on the western research findings. For the biophysical, biochemical and the epidemiologic data, we use uncritically the western findings – whether be these reasonably applied solving health problems of our native people. Had we ever thought or questioned – “Are the findings of investigations conducted on the American or European people useful for Bangladesh? We would have or could have found something else. Here lies the truth and the tragedy of the developing world.

A medical science journal lives on research fueled by health-related problems and questions. Critical thinking and curiosity are the beginning of knowledge. Unfortunately, very critical thinking has not been given importance, rather neglected in the entire education career. We should note – critical thinkers look for inconsistencies within medical texts and narratives. It is the skill to analyze and authenticate inconsistent experiences and observations in health science. If we do not exercise such skills, we cannot determine the inconsistencies we face every day medical practice. The eventuality is to depend on others. We are very much accustomed to being guided by the West. Sometimes, we are dictated. Unfortunately, many a times, we are to abide by the dictation against our will. Our mindset has been developed for decades or even centuries not to withstand those undesirable, useless, and impracticable advice. Why? The answer is simple – We have no research and no scientific knowledge or evidence to rationalize their suggestions. We have never attempted to test or analyze the available health information. Hence, we lack both medical knowledge and wisdom. Knowledge of facts and information is somewhat a part of wisdom. Wisdom is the ability to take knowledge and apply it to solve our own health problems.

We hope and firmly believe that this journal of EM will thrive. There are many young researchers in Bangladesh involved in the discipline who are very much capable and competent to make this journey of the journal a success.

We know – the subject “EM” is very versatile. It is expanding and multitalented. As with the advances in science and technology, newer endocrine glands and secretions are explored. In the past, we had no thought about ghrelin, discovered in 1999, adiponectin in 2007, irisin in 2012, leptin in 2013, and asprosin in 2016. Moreover, many more are expected in line. Adipose tissue is established as an endocrine gland that secretes lots of hormones yet remained unknown. Likewise, muscle tissue has been known to secrete irisin, and other myokines yet to be explored. Very exciting findings are waiting to revolutionize the field of EM – how the gut microbiota and related secretions regulate hypothalamo–hypophysis axis, commonly known as gut–brain axis, and even more recent observation is the Brain–Bowel–Bone communication. As mentioned, expanding Endocrinology, bile acid is now established as hormones or nutrient signaling molecules that help regulate glucose, lipid, lipoprotein, energy metabolism, and various inflammatory responses.

These findings of EM mentioned above invite the attention of the Endocrinologists of the developing world, and more importantly, of the Bangladeshi Endocrinologists. All explorations appear to be useless unless we investigate ourselves. Let us pledge not simply to imitate. Let us start newly with our own potential inquisitive young Endocrinologists. We need to change our learning objectives. According to Epistemologists, “Learning is the process of acquiring new or modifying existing, knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences.” For acquiring new knowledge and modifying the existing knowledge on EM, it is of utmost necessity to exercise critical thinking asking about inconsistencies regarding the existing medical knowledge we have achieved so far.

The emergence of the science journal “BJEM” is a pioneering endeavor to accept the challenges of new exploration in the field. This Journal is expected to be continuously powered by the studies on our own health issues conducted by Bangladeshi young and energetic researchers.

We foresee a competent and glorious achievement of the Journal, BJEM enriching medical science and particularly exploring growing Endocrinology in Bangladesh.